Customer journey mapping for a CIO

Customer journey mapping for a CIO

If you’re like most CIOs, your firm has embarked on the latest craze – customer journey mapping.  I’ve blogged about this before.  It’s a terrific exercise – intended to identify how customers engage with your firm through every type of interaction – personal, machine, or paper.  Most are focused on optimizing the interactions between the policyholder and the insurer; some include optimization of the agent experience, and some are starting to look at expanding the experience to look at how to embed the insurance experience in non-insurance aspects of an insureds life.  (See FIGO for a great example).

Some firms have hired third party consultants to help with this exercise; some have even put a new position in place – a Customer Experience Officer – someone who looks across the traditional siloes of underwriting, claims and finance to craft a holistic experience. 

As carriers go through this exercise, demands are being placed on the IT team. Here’s a few ways you may be asked to participate:

  • Data and reporting– Part of understanding the customer journey is tracking it.  Understanding where the biggest interaction points are, and where the biggest pain points are is the first step in improving the experience. You may be asked to install tracking software on the website (if it’s not already there).  Third party data and AI may play into new segmentation schemes as teams are looking at new ways of doing dynamic segmentation (See my report on this topic)  You may be asked to add new reporting or analytics tools as the team looks at using predictive modeling to identify next best action. And you’ll be asked to measure the progress of the new journeys through new reports and new metrics such as a customer friction factor.
  • Workflow and Task Automation – Much of customer journey mapping is figuring out how to operationalize the new journey.  Once the customer experience has been defined, the hard part is to deliver on it.  If you are reliant on people to deliver a consistent experience, you leave yourself open to error.  Your team may need to spend much more time defining business rules and implementing workflows to deliver the experience. If you are one of the insurers that has not yet automated this, you may need to consider adding some additional technology.  (This has actually been one of the major drivers of core system replacement).
  • Customer Communication – Insurers are looking at eliminating the jargon and simplifying the message. This may mean redoing forms or creating new forms.  That’s not a huge deal.  But where we see more effort is finding new ways of communicating with customers.  Text, mobile applications and video are all growing ways of communication.   Here’s a great example of automated video communication to deliver a personal touch with no people involved.  Push communications, text or phone messages letting the claimant know their check has been issued, for example, can reduce calls to the call center while improving customer satisfaction
  • Omni-channel access – Smartphones are on track to bypass desktop computers as the number one way to access websites.   You’ll need to make the website mobile-friendly.  But you also may need to put in a call center – especially for those insurers who are looking at adding a direct or semi-direct channel. 
  • Cool stuff – As insurers start going down this path and get more comfortable being creative, they often look to add more ‘cool stuff’.  Gamification is one of the newer areas – using game techniques to drive engagement and to drive behaviors.  Drones are reducing the need for scheduling inspections.  Video chat for first notice of loss can reduce fraud and improve satisfaction.  There are many tools – and many InsureTech startups playing in this space. One last area that can be kind of cool – the user interface.  If you don’t have formal skills in this area, definitely use an outside consulting firm to help with this. UI design is fairly complex and makes a huge difference in the customer experience.  All of this cool stuff requires integration. One note, while the partners out there likely all have open APIs,  your team may end up spending more time than anticipated making sure your own systems can integrate and send data and service calls back and forth.
  • An agile organization –  As insurers become more skilled at understanding how to tweak and enhance the customer journey, speed becomes even more important.  Creating an innovative, agile organization  is a critical aspect of delivering quickly.  If you haven’t chatted with Mike Fitzgerald on innovation, or Colleen Risk on shifting to an agile development process, now might be the time.

In a highly fragmented industry with excess capital and declining rates, insurers are looking to building a solid customer experience to drive growth and retention.  Journey mapping is one of the tools being used.  Time to step into the fray and get involved. 

Reflections from the Digital Insurance Agenda, Amsterdam

Reflections from the Digital Insurance Agenda, Amsterdam

Earlier this month Craig Beattie and I ventured off to Amsterdam to attend the Digital Insurance Agenda (DIA), where we also delivered a keynote. This was the event’s second year and, within just 12 months, it has grown significantly to around 850 people – attracting insurers, innovative technology players (from both the establishment and budding entrepreneurs), and investors from across Europe and beyond. The format is a sprightly mix of keynote presentations, panels, and live demonstrations. And, like last year, it was another great mix of people and ideas, each focused on driving change in customer engagement across the industry through technology.

(Venue: Gashouder at the Westergasfabriek. An impressive venue – with Celent on stage somewhere up there at the front :-))

Key take-aways for me were:

  • Distribution and front-end engagement remains a strong area of focus for innovation. However, unlike recent history where investment has been heavily channelled into mobile or touch-enabled browser experiences, the presence of chat and other app-less modes of interaction were strongly evidenced throughout most of the live demos. This has been a hot trend over the last 12 months, and where Celent has explored both insurer and consumer attitudes towards it (see Celent report: Applying Conversational Commerce to Insurance: Aligning IT to the Machine World). Given the issues that many insurers have had with trying to encourage customers to download their apps and engage with them through them, it’s not hard to see why 'smart chat' is being pursued so aggressively.
     
  • Heavier focus on the use of data for risk profiling and the application of emerging AI techniques (beyond chat use-cases). Personally, I find it incredible just how low the entry barriers have become for experimenting with data and AI. The perfect storm of huge compute power via the cloud, open-source and pay-per-use models for advanced technology enables those with relatively modest means and a great idea to get started. For me, this continues to be one of the most interesting areas in our industry for mining value. It’s also an area that insurers still find a challenge (see Celent report: Tackling the Big Data Challenges in Global Insurance: Differences Across Continents and Use Cases).
     
  • Celent has been tracking the development of innovation partnerships across the industry for a number of years (see Celent report: Insurer-Startup Partnerships: How to Maximize Insurtech Investments). At DIA, it was easy to see this in action. The vast majority of firms presenting were not a direct threat to the industry at large, but instead were exemplars of better ways of doing things through the use of smart technology. It’s not hard to envision that a few of the firms demonstrating at DIA will walk straight into pilots following the event.

The event was closed with a keynote from Scott Walcheck of Trov. Scott shared openly some of the progress that they have been making – which, to me, feels impressive. For example, they now have ~60-70 engineers working on the team and claim to be growing revenue by ~44% month-on-month (albeit from a starting position of zero).

Out of all of the insurtech start-up activity globally, there are just a handful of firms (in my opinion) who have the potential to really shake things up – and Trov is one of these.  They now have the capital, the engineering capacity and the partnerships to do some truly incredible things – if they choose to.

I also found it interesting to hear that they have started to evolve their business model into three focus areas, being: (1) Trov as a direct brand; (2) White-labelled Trov; and (3) Insurance-as-a-service, where they will rent their platform to partners – plus with an aspiration to evolve it into auto, home and other lines.  Given Celent’s focus on technology research across the industry, this last model-type is of keen interest. Trov’s engineering capacity is already a similar size to (and in some cases larger than) many mid-to-small insurance carriers. It is also larger than some of the traditional independent solution technology providers out there. Could they be the next big technology player on the scene in addition to their existing branded business?  Only time will tell, but it is clear they are already demonstrating how insurtech represents a new way of delivering insurance product development.

For more commentary on DIA, see Craig Beattie’s Moments on Twitter.  Also, keep checking the DIA website as they will shortly release some of the videos from the event.

Closing the deal with e-signature

Closing the deal with e-signature

E-signature has become such a part of my life that I am surprised when I am asked to provide a wet signature. I sign for credit card purchases, deliveries and legal documents, even my tax returns (!), using a click or a digital signature pad. But, if I want to change my beneficiary for my life insurance, I have to download a .pdf, sign the document with a pen, and mail it to the insurer. Insurance has been a slow adopter of e-signature. However, as the process of buying life insurance and receiving post-issue service is becoming increasingly more digitized, insurers are working to remove paper from everyday processes.

The adoption of e-applications, web portals, and mobile technology is helping to drive the change, but it is my belief that it is primarily driven by customer expectations set by other industries offering easy-to-use digital processes. Consumers expect companies to be easy to do business with and will choose the company they purchase goods or services from based on the ease of use. E-signatures provide a way to offer a digital experience that is easy to use, fast, and secure.

In our new report, Putting a Lock on Straight Through Processing, my colleague Karen Monks and I profile 11 providers of e-signature technology for insurance. This is the final report in a series that began last year.  During the year, we looked extensively at new business acquisition and the technologies that power it. We wrote reports on solution providers for illustrations, e-application, and new business and underwriting in addition to e-signature. Along with the vendor reports, the series included two benchmarking reports and a report in which insurers compared their level of automation to Celent's automation capability matrix to determine if they are minimally, moderately, or highly automated.  

With the increased emphasis on cycle time and cost, e-signature is being increasingly being adopted as a way to check the box on making processes fast, flexible, and efficient. E-signature software frequently integrates with other solutions to support new business acquisition as well as post-sale service.

The ability to collect an electronic signature for a new application at the time of sale providing the legal authorization to obtain underwriting requirements and evidence from third party providers has enabled straight-through processing and the ability to provide a decision to the applicant within minutes, instead of weeks.

Common e-signature use cases for life insurance:

  • New policy application
  • Disclosure delivery
  • Agent licensing and appointment
  • E-delivery of policies
  • Beneficiary change and other policy servicing
  • Premium payments

Life insurers that investigate e-signatures will be pleasantly surprised by how quickly and relatively inexpensively e-signature can be implemented as well as how easily and securely a paper signature process can be automated. I am a big fan, as I’m sure you are, of less paper and more automation!

 

A cautionary tale of legacy technology or how to avoid a major meltdown in your organization

A cautionary tale of legacy technology or how to avoid a major meltdown in your organization

Were any of you flying Delta from April 5 to April 9?  If so, this story will be no surprise to you.  For the rest of you, you may remember it was spring break and terrible weather pounded Atlanta. The severe weather caused a five–day meltdown across Delta’s flight network and over 4,000 flights were cancelled. During those five days, Delta struggled mightily with two basic functions of its business – flying airplanes and accommodating passengers. The weather is, of course, out of Delta’s control, but the response and the ensuing chaos was amplified by something insurers understand all too well — the lack of modern technology. 

According to a Wall Street Journal article, the root of the problem was a telephone busy signal. An internal investigation found the biggest problem was that Delta’s 13,000 pilots and 20,000 flight attendants calling in for a new assignment couldn’t get through to the people in Atlanta who were rebuilding the airline schedule. Computers told gate agents rescheduled crews would be there, but the flights would end up canceled for lack of a crew member who was lost in Delta’s communication fiasco and unaware of the assignment.

I have to confess, my first thought when I read this article was to wonder how on earth a major company like Delta can be so lacking in modern technology. My next thought was wow, this is true for the insurance industry as well. While life insurance companies don’t have the challenges of rescheduling thousands of flights, a negative change in the stock market can create thousands of customer calls. And when a major catastrophe occurs, property casualty insurers can also be inundated by phone calls.

Delta’s response was to double the size of the crew-tracking team, dramatically increase the number of phone lines by June; and hope to have a system which will be able to send crews information about their trips electronically by August.

Rather than relying on hope, following are suggestions for insurers so that they can avoid the type of meltdown experienced by Delta:

  • Self-service portals or apps where customers can check their balances, make changes to their policies, and communicate with their insurer.
  • Chatbots that can provide answers to questions without human interaction.
  • Text messages to keep insureds informed.
  • Webchat to allow communication via the website.
  • Omni-channel support to allow seamless switching between devices.

We can’t control the weather or the stock market.  Unexpected events will happen.  But, how an insurer responds to them can have a significant impact on the customer experience and the customer long term relationship with the insurer.  In a hyper-competitive market, customer experience is a key differentiator.

If you are interested in building a better customer experience, here is a report you may find interesting, Standing Out in a Bland World: Global Life Insurance Customer Service Strategies.

A Day to Celebrate: Celent 2017 Model Insurer Winners

A Day to Celebrate:  Celent 2017 Model Insurer Winners

Last April 4, Boston, a city surrounded by history of patriotism and independence, was witness of Celent Innovation and Insight Day (I&I day), an event in which 16 insurers were recognized as Model Insurers for their technological initiatives that, I’m sure, inspired more 280 professionals of the Financial Service industry by the efforts and ideas on how other insurers could implement them within their organizations.

Andrew Rear, chief executive of Munich Re Digital Partners was the Model Insurer keynote speaker. He discussed the role of Insuretech for large insurers and spoke of how these insurers could acquire agility, the pathway that they needed to choose, and more importantly, the risks they had to bear. He also discussed how Financial Services were redefining the way financial products are sold, delivered, and serviced.

No sensible website asks you for your email address anymore. They should know who you are by other means

~Andrew Rear

 

In the afternoon, our analysts participated in a series of debates focusing on the Internet of Things (IoT); Artificial Intelligence (AI); and Blockchain which was lively discussion. In between, Celent presented its Model Insurers for five categories and the Model Insurer of the Year.

Digital and Omnichannel

  • CUNA Mutual Group

The rapid development and launch of a simplified-issue term life insurance product that enables members to apply entirely online, answering only two health questions supported by a completely automated underwriting platform that delivers an instant decision in minutes.

  • Lincoln Financial Group

Lincoln Financial created a digital process to meet customer expectations of doing business, automate underwriting, reduce cycle time, and minimize human touch.

  • New York Life

The New York Life Portal initiative utilized digital connectivity and a ratings engine cloud-based platform to achieve a faster process and empower various actors across the organization.

To learn more of these Model Insurers, please read our report here.

Legacy and Ecosystem Transformation

  • Republic Indemnity

Republic Indemnity’s previous home-grown, legacy policy administration system was implemented in 1994 as a single state, Workers Compensation policy administration system. As the previous system could not issue multi-state policies and with the concern of technology obsolesce, Republic Indemnity looked for a new solution to replace its home-grown, legacy system.

  • ERS

Under new management, the business had to transform itself rapidly and replace 20-year-old technology. It had a major license renewal date in two years and would have been locked in by the vendor to a prohibitively expensive contract. It set about transforming claims first, and then policy with full data migration and scheme rationalization, all while growing the underlying gross written premium

  • Insurance Corporation of British Columbia

At the beginning of 2013, the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC) launched the Insurance Sales and Administration System (ISAS) policy transformation program. This was the last project in ICBC’s overall $400 million Transformation Program, which had already successfully replaced legacy claims systems and implemented a new Enterprise Data Warehouse and an enterprise service-oriented architecture.

To learn more of these Model Insurers, please read our report here.

Innovation and Emerging Technologies

  • Suramericana de Seguros S.A.- Wesura

Wesura (Sura) created a peer-to-peer Insurance platform around social networks. It develops private insurance communities so final users can share risk and underwrite people who wants to belong to the private community, the bigger the community the more benefits one can receive.

  • Church Mutual Insurance Company

Church Mutual Insurance Company has partnered with The Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company (HSB), part of Munich Re, to provide temperature and water sensors connected to a 24/7 monitoring system. This innovative Internet of Things (IoT) technology solution is designed to alert customers to take action before damages and disruptions to their ministries can occur.

  • Markerstudy Insurance

Markerstudy launched VisionTrack in February 2016 to tackle the challenge insurers are facing with rising fraudulent motor claims and to help improve driver behavior.

To learn more of these Model Insurers, please read our report here.

Operational Excellence

  • Aflac

Aflac was in need of some modernizing and is still likely to undergo more change as the industry continues to capitalize on social, mobile, and wearables. In response, the Aflac IT Division implemented an Agile Transformation to its projects and processes to meet the changing needs of the customers.

  • Saxon

Saxon serves the Cayman island community. With a limited pool to hire from or sell product to, Saxon realized that to remain viable in the insurance market, it needed to employ technology to better serve the needs of its customers and grow the business.

  • MassMutual

MassMutual offers a Data Science Development Program (DSDP) in Amherst, MA that trains promising, recent graduates to become well-rounded data scientists over a period of three years. The program combines rigorous academic coursework and practical data science projects for MassMutual — a unique and valuable combination.

To learn more of these Model Insurers, please read our report here.

Data Analytics

  • The Savings Bank Life Insurance Company of Massachusetts

SBLI implemented an advanced risk assessment solution using predictive modeling and data analytics to help reduce cycle times, decrease dropout rates, and eliminate the need to pull fluids and conduct exams, while pricing policies more competitively, placing applicants into appropriate risk classes, and improving customer experience.

  • StarStone Specialty Insurance Company

The initiative is based on the implementation of analytics tools to measure and reduce risk. The solution uses data from internal and external sources. The data may be structured or unstructured. This tool helps underwriters make better decisions.

  • Meteo Protect

Although a broker, Meteo Protect gives clients a means to evaluate how climate variability contributes to their companies’ results by analyzing the relationship between each business activity and the weather. It couples this with a platform to price and underwrite fully customized index-based weather insurance, for any business anywhere in the world.

To learn more of these Model Insurers, please read our report here.

CSE, Model Insurer of the Year

In 2017, CSE has been awarded Model Insurer of the Year for its aspiration to achieve “the best product in the industry.” This meant they had to overcome legacy thinking and practices to re-think all the features including coverage, pricing, rules, process, and communications To do so, they sought inputs from customers and analyzed the market using two common analyses: 5 Cs and SWOT. From this point on, CSE assembled and adapted its core system.

To learn more of the Model Insurers of the Year, please read our report here.

The quality of the submissions this year is a clear indication the industry is turning a corner and embracing transformation, digital initiatives, innovation and valuing data analytics.  It is inspiring to see the positive results the insurers have achieved and a pleasure to recognize them as Model Insurers for their best practices in insurance technology.

How about your company? As you read this, are you thinking of an initiative in your company that should be recognized? We are always looking for good examples of the use of technology in insurance. Stay tuned for more information regarding 2018 Model Insurer nominations.

Digitizing Life Insurance New Business with Technology and Tools

Digitizing Life Insurance New Business with Technology and Tools

In February Celent published its second report using data from a 2016 New Business Benchmarking Survey. The first report compared data based on the average face value of products sold by the participating insurers. The second report presented the same benchmarking data but considered technology as the main focus. It compared the overall averages for a set of key metrics with the averages for high and low technology users throughout the new business process. The findings from the report were not surprising; except for the fact that we had to acknowledge that technology in the new business is still slow to take hold.

We found that electronic application use is on the rise. Just less than one half of all applications by the participating insurers were submitted electronically. The insurers that sold moderate face value policies were more apt to use electronic applications than insurers that sell high face value policies. That makes complete sense since most insurers begin their eApplication journey with less complex products like term or whole life. Celent believes that all insurers can achieve benefits from eApplications. Less than half the insurers in the study Insurer reported having an eApplication, and those with captive insurers submitted a larger percent of their new business via eApps. Direct to consumer as a channel was reported by four of the insurers and they received 20% of their applications from e-apps targeted to consumers.

Data quality is a critical issue that strongly impacts unit costs. As a group, the insurers that participated in this study estimated that 69% of all paper applications received were not in good order (NIGO). For those that implemented eApps and have a technology heavy new business process the NIGO rate fell to 5%.

We also found that imaging systems were ubiquitous. Ninety-eight percent of paper applications were imaged. Imaging was also used for the underwriting requirements that are received in paper. Workflow systems were also very common. But as the process moved closer the underwriting evaluation the level of automation began to drop off. Seventy percent of the participating insurers could automatically order and receive underwriting requirements; however, this happened for less than a quarter of the applications. Since most third party providers of underwriting evidence can provide data in digital formats, this Celent recommends this as an area for future investment by insurers. Further down the line shows that technology is not king in the underwriting departments yet. Automated application evaluation, underwriting/case management workbenches, and electronic signatures were used by over half of the insurers in the study; however, less than 40% of all applications were managed on a workbench. Even fewer were processed by an underwriting system, and only 12% included electronic signatures. Electronic policy delivery, new in the 2016 survey, occurred for 4% of all applications.

When an insurer is fully automated in the NBUW process, benefits can be seen in cost and time metrics. For insurers that implemented technology throughout their new business process the unit cost per application dropped from US$312 to US$237, and unit cost per policy issued fell from US$440 to US$329. The average cycle time fell from 38 days to 17 days for the insurers that implemented a full suite of new business and underwriting technology into their process.

The highest-level conclusion that can be drawn from this new business benchmarking data is that even among top-tier insurers, there are significant differences in new business performance, particularly when technology is considered. Creating performance measures such as unit cost, percentage of new submissions “in good order,” and cycle time is essential. Monitoring those measures against a peer group will be an eye-opening experience for insurers that do not do it today. While direct comparisons between insurers are difficult due to product and channel differences, this study and our previous one suggest there is a strong relationship between face amount and unit cost. It also suggests that technology can have an impact on costs and cycle times when it is implemented across the process or even in just parts. Insurers are urged to analyze their own performance, starting with metrics such as unit cost per application received, unit cost per policy issued, and percentage of cases received not in good order.

The notion that life insurance underwriting is more art than science (and thus exempt from automation) is misleading at best. It is true that the subtleties in underwriting present unique challenges for technology. But underwriting is a process like many others in that it requires certain data as input, and there are rules that govern both the process flow and the decisions that result from it. Following basic principles of getting clean data and automating wherever possible will help insurers do their jobs more cheaply and more effectively.

Process improvement strategies should focus on implementing electronic applications, automating the receipt of third party underwriting evidence, and automating underwriting decisions. The order depends on the distribution strategy and change management processes in place to maximize the benefit. Few insurers have maximized the potential value of new business automation, but the findings in this report show the time savings and cost reduction potential of implementing technology across the new business process flow.

Back to the Future

Back to the Future

A long time ago, before joining Celent, I was part of the insurance industry from the insurer side and my work was to look for ways to improve the company’s processes and innovate. I really liked the job because you had to come up with ideas and accept that you had restrictions, and sometimes you had to face the sad truth that the technology supporting your ideas wasn't available.

Now at Celent, I’ve witnessed a whole new world of possibilities because, as part of Celent, we are exposed to many, many successful cases implementing technology in insurance through research and events, especially in events like our Innovation & Insight day (I&I day). This year our I&I day takes place in Boston, Massachusetts on April 4, and Celent will award the best Information Technology (IT) initiatives in insurance.

That day, Celent will be presenting winners in 5 categories.

  • Digital and Omnichannel
  • Legacy and Ecosystem Transformation
  • Innovation and Emerging Technologies
  • Operational Excellence
  • Data Analytics

The Model Insurer Award is recognition of an insurer’s effective use of technology in a certain area or theme, not necessarily a statement that the insurer is absolutely best in class (although some may be). Model Insurer success highlights the insurer’s ability to improve performance and meet market demands when tackling issues that face all insurers today.

For instance, do the below examples sound familiar to you?

  • Under new management, the business had to transform itself rapidly and replace 20-year old technology. This insurer had a major license renewal date two years out and would have been locked in by the vendor to a prohibitively expensive contract.
  • An insurance company needed to create a digital process to meet customer expectations of doing business, automate underwriting, reduce cycle time and minimize human touch.
  • Another insurer utilized digital connectivity and ratings engine cloud-based platform to achieve a faster process and empower various actors across the organization.

I’m sure the examples above are the types of projects you’d like to implement at your company, but these are just a sample of the case studies we received. This year we received around 60 case studies applying for our Model Insurer Award. Of those, fifteen will be awarded Model Insurer and one will be the Model Insurer of the Year.

Personally, this year has been different. This year, I was amazed about the quality of cases we received and methodology that insurers are using to implement their projects, which made very difficult to deliberate. I’m not saying this is bad thing, on the contrary; it is a sign that the industry is on the move and it is using the best technology available.

I wish I had a time machine like in “Back to the Future” to go back to the days I worked for insurance companies, and tell my younger self: “you cannot miss this event; it will help you with your project.”

So, this is my advice. If you are part of the insurance industry and you are working in IT projects, this is the type of events you may want to attend to benchmark and learn about initiatives around the world that would help you define yours.

Lost in Innovation?

Lost in Innovation?

So, how do you avoid getting lost in innovation? The simple (and maybe glib) answer might be to buy a map, a compass and start to plan your route. However, what do you do when there is no map, no obvious path to take and no-one to follow?

The last 24 months have seen an incredible amount of activity across the sector in experimenting with novel proposition concepts fuelled by emerging technologies in the internet of things, distributed ledgers and bot-driven artificial intelligence. Although each new concept shows promise, we are yet to experience a clear and obvious pattern for winning new clients or delivering a superior shareholder return using them. Many of the most exciting novel ideas (and many are genuinely exciting) are yet to see any real business volume behind them (see my earlier blog for additional context of what insurtech has to offer in defining the ‘dominant design’ for new tech-enabled propositions).

So, as an insurer faced with having to balance how much it should invest in these new concepts versus furthering the existing business in what is probably a highly successful and scalable model, two of the big questions we often hear from clients are: “Which of these nascent concepts are most likely to deliver real business value the fastest?” and “How much effort should I be devoting to exploring them today?” These are the questions that we looked to address at our latest event in London that we called ‘Lost in Innovation’, attended by just over 70 inquiring insurance decision makers.

Faced with uncertainty, we followed an agenda that focused on the things that an insurer can control, such as the innovation-led partnerships they enter, the skills they develop internally, the criteria used for measuring value, and the potential challenges ahead that they need to plan for.

Celent analyst Craig Beattie presenting on emerged software development approaches

Alongside presenting some of our latest research on the topic, we were joined on-stage by:

  • Matt Poll from NEOS (the UK’s first connected home proposition in partnership with Hiscox) shared his experience on the criteria for a successful partnership.
     
  • Jennyfer Yeung-Williams from Munich Re and Polly James from Berwin, Leighton, Paisner Law shared their experience and views on some of the challenges in the way of further adoption, including the attitude of the regulator and potential legal challenges presented by using personal data in propositions.
     
  • Dan Feihn, Group CTO from Markerstudy, presented his view of the future and how they are creating just enough space internally to experiment with some radical concepts – demonstrating that you don’t always need big budget project to try out some novel applications of new technologies.

So, what was the conclusion from the day? How do you avoid getting lost in innovation? Simply speaking, when concepts are so new that the direction of travel is unclear, a more explorative approach is required – testing each new path, collecting data and then regrouping to create the tools needed to unveil new paths further ahead until the goal is reached. Scaling concepts too early in their development (and before they are ready) may be akin to buying a 4×4 to plough through the scrub ‘on a hunch’ only to find quicksand on the other side.

Some tips shared to help feel out the way:

  • Partnerships will remain a strong feature of most insurer’s innovation activity over the next 12-24 months. Most struggle to create the space to try out new concepts. Also, realistically, many neither have the skills or the time to experiment (given that their existing capabilities are optimised for the existing business). Consequently, partnerships create a way to experiment without “upsetting the applecart”.
     
  • Hiring staff from outside of the industry can be a great way to change the culture internally and bring-in fresh new ideas…however, unless there is an environment in place to keep them enthused, there remains a risk of them turning ‘blue’ and adopting the existing culture instead of helping to change it.
     
  • There are several ways to measure value created by an initiative. The traditional approach is a classic ‘Return on Investment’ (RoI). However, RoI can be hard to calculate when uncertainty is high. To encourage experimentation, other approaches may be better suited, such as rapid low-cost releases to test concepts and gather data to feel the way. Framing these in terms of an ‘affordable loss’ may be another way to approach it – i.e. “What’s the maximum amount that I’m willing to spend to test this out?” – accepting that there may not be an RoI for the initial step. Although no responsible insurer should be ‘betting the house’ on wacky new concepts, reframing the question and containing exposure can sometimes be all that’s required to create the licence to explore.
     
  • There’s still an imbalance between the promise of technology and the reality of just how far end-customers and insurers are willing to go in pursuit of value. The geeks (or ‘path finders’) have rushed in first – but will the majority follows? Regardless, to avoid getting lost in the ‘shiny new stuff’, a focus on customer value, fairness and transparency around how data is being used need to be at the heart of each proposition – plus, recognising that the regulator will not be far behind.
     

In summary, the journey ahead needs to be less about the ‘what’ (with all of its bells, whistles and shiny parts) and more about the ‘how’ (deep in the culture of the firm and its willingness to experiment – even in small ways) – at least while the map to future value is being still being drawn.

Celent continues to research all of these topics, including assessing the different technologies and techniques that insurers can use. Feel free to get in touch to discuss how Celent could assist your organisation further.

Celent clients will be able to access the presentations from the event via their Celent Account Manager.

The new customer experience – or how so many carriers are getting journey mapping wrong

The new customer experience – or how so many carriers are getting journey mapping wrong

Journey mapping, the process of defining the customer experience, is an activity that has been gaining in popularity over the last two years.  Carriers are using this technique to document the existing customer experience in order to identify areas to improve.  The underlying assumption is that a superior customer experience will drive retention and perhaps improve new business.  Which makes sense.  After all, it’s pretty evident that customers are demanding a different relationship model from their insurers.  They are looking for more transparency and simplicity. They are increasingly self-directed and financially literate.  And they are demanding increasing participation. 

Their expectations are increasingly driven by experience in non-insurance categories.   I can see where my uber car is real-time – why can’t I tell if my claim check has been issued.   I can custom assemble a new pc online with instant knowledge of all the options available and the price associated with them – why can’t I tell what additional insurance options are available and what they cost.   I can get recommendations from Amazon on what I might like and what others like me are purchasing – why can’t I get  good recommendation from a carrier to help me compile the best package of coverages, terms and conditions to suit my profile. 

While efforts have been made to drive effectiveness for insurance processes from an internal perspective, there are still many areas where improvements are possible from a customer perspective. So carriers are working to define an extraordinary experience for customers. They’re defining personas, mapping the new business acquisition process, the billing process, claims, complaint handling, customer inquiries, and all the major processes that occur when customers interact with carriers. 

But that’s the problem. Carriers are focusing on optimizing all those places where the customer and the carrier interact.  Now don’t get me wrong. There is nothing wrong with this.  Carriers should make sure that interactions are optimized.  Focusing on automating decisions, automating correspondence, and using workflow to assure tasks are completed in a timely manner can have a dramatic effect on delivering a consistently good experience.  Omni channel, real time, digitization – all those trendy words – are very relevant here. But it’s not enough.

If you really want to build loyalty, think about the customer experience when they aren’t interacting with you. Let me give you an example. 

Allstate has a target market of motorcycle riders, and has a mobile app for them called GoodRide.  The app is available for both Allstate customers and non Allstate customers.  It helps riders keep track of all repairs and maintenance.  They can plan a ride –  checking weather, locate gas, and even find others to ride with as it is integrated to social media. They can track their ride by adding notes, adding photos and tracking miles ridden. There’s even a gamification element that awards badges.   And by the way, they can report a claim, check proof of insurance and pay their bill.  So this application really looks at what motorcycle riders are looking to do outside of the insurance interaction and embeds the insurance interactions within the full context of the customer’s life and where insurance itself plays a role rather than simply looking at the interactions discreetly.

In the commercial lines world, a similar application could be industry based and provide tailored risk management materials, an “Ask an Expert” corner where customers can check in with risk management consultants,   create a Facebook-like collaboration mechanism for customers to talk to each other,  arrange discounts on products relevant to the industry.  and of course, access their policy online, pay a bill, pull a loss run or handle other interactions. 

Expanding the customer experience beyond the pure insurance interactions makes a carrier more relevant to a customer by engaging in their everyday lives and looking for ways of adding value within context.  And it creates a way to have an ongoing conversation with a customer – building personal loyalty. 

So – is customer journey mapping a good idea?  Of course.  Are carriers thinking big enough? That is a different question.

What I will say, is exactly what I told a carrier earlier today –  The secret to organic growth?  Deliver a customer experience that your competitors can’t match. 

How Insurity’s Acquisition of Valen Could Create a Virtuous Analytics Circle

How Insurity’s Acquisition of Valen Could Create a Virtuous Analytics Circle
It’s open season on insurance technology acquisitions in general, and for Insurity in particular. Today’s announcement of Insurity’s acquisition of Valen Analytics is now Insurity’s fourth acquisition in a multi-year string: Oceanwide, Tropics, and in rapid succession Systema and Valen.   The potential for crossing selling among the five customer bases is obvious.   Less obvious, but of potentially even greater value, is Insurity’s ability to invite all of its insurer and other customers to use its Enterprise Data Solutions IEV solution as the gateway to Valen’s contributory database and Valen’s InsureRight analytic platform.   Insurity now has the scale and the means to create a virtuous analytics circle: individual customers contributing a lot of data through IEV to Valens and receiving back analytic insights to feed into their pricing, underwriting, and claims operations.   Good move.