How Insurity’s Acquisition of Valen Could Create a Virtuous Analytics Circle

How Insurity’s Acquisition of Valen Could Create a Virtuous Analytics Circle
It’s open season on insurance technology acquisitions in general, and for Insurity in particular. Today’s announcement of Insurity’s acquisition of Valen Analytics is now Insurity’s fourth acquisition in a multi-year string: Oceanwide, Tropics, and in rapid succession Systema and Valen.   The potential for crossing selling among the five customer bases is obvious.   Less obvious, but of potentially even greater value, is Insurity’s ability to invite all of its insurer and other customers to use its Enterprise Data Solutions IEV solution as the gateway to Valen’s contributory database and Valen’s InsureRight analytic platform.   Insurity now has the scale and the means to create a virtuous analytics circle: individual customers contributing a lot of data through IEV to Valens and receiving back analytic insights to feed into their pricing, underwriting, and claims operations.   Good move.

Guidewire Acquisition of FirstBest – A Wakeup Call for Core Suite Vendors?

Guidewire Acquisition of FirstBest – A Wakeup Call for Core Suite Vendors?

The Guidewire acquisition of First Best should come as a wakeup call to other suite vendors in the marketplace.   Not to be a doomsayer, but the reality is the market for core system replacements is shrinking.  Many carriers are in the middle of a replacement or have already completed their replacement.  There are fewer and fewer deals to be had and more and more vendors in the marketplace chasing those deals.  

Let’s look at the numbers.   Donald Light’s recent PAS Deal Trends report shows that we’ve seen an average of around 85 deals a year over the last two years.  But there are more than 60 suite vendors out there.  Of those available deals, a very few key vendors – including Guidewire – will likely get half or more of them.   That leaves around 40 deals for the remaining 60’ish vendors.  That’s less than one each.  And that’s IF we assume the market will stay steady at 80-85 deals a year. This basic math shows that many core suite vendors will not get a single deal in 2017.  

So how can vendors satisfy their shareholders?  How can they generate growth and remain viable players?  The truth is some of them won’t.  But smart vendors are thinking about other options for growth.  And they have a few paths they can take. 

  • Sell things other than suites.  This is the tactic that Guidewire is showing with their recent announcement of the FirstBest acquisition and is also illustrated by their prior acquisitions of Millbrook and Eagle Eye.  Duck Creek is doing the same as shown by their acquisition of Agencyport.  Providing other core applications that carriers need allows a vendor to continue to grow their existing relationships, and allows them to create new relationships with carriers – even if the carrier doesn’t need a new core system.  Some vendors will purchase these additional applications; others will build them.
  • Sell to a different market – Insurity’s acquisition of Tropics lets them go down market to work with small WC carriers.  Their acquisition of Oceanwide gives them the ability to handle small specialty, or Greenfield projects.  While there are still plenty of deals to be done in the under $100M carrier market, most vendors can’t play in this space. Their price points won’t work for small carriers, and their implementation process won’t work. It’s too expensive and takes too many carrier resources.  The implementation process has to be drastically  different for a carrier with only 6 people in the IT department than it is for a larger carrier.   This strategy of going down market only works if a vendor can appropriately sell and deliver their solution to a small carrier while still making margin – and many vendors just can’t do that. 
  • Enter a different territory – Vue announced today they’ve entered Asia with Aviva; Sapiens entered the US by purchasing MaxProcessing.  And we see other vendors including Guidewire, EIS, and Duck Creek moving outside the US.
  • Sell services – many vendors provide cloud offerings – which provides a steadier stream of income.   Vendors such as CSC or The Innovation Group (prior to the split) had/have a large proportion of revenue coming from services.  Vendors like ISCS provide additional BPO services such as mail services and imaging.   

Any of these strategies are viable – but I predict we’ll see more vendors using them as the market for core system replacements shrinks.  Smart vendors are already thinking ahead, working on their long term strategy. 

Carriers who work with these vendors should be watching as well.  No one wants to work with a vendor that won't be here for the long term.  If you’re a carrier considering a new system –

  • Make sure your vendor is showing momentum – new sales.
  • Look to see what the signals are for their long term viability – will they be a survivor selling new suites?
  • Do they have the resources to create or acquire new capabilities like portals, analytics or distribution management?
  • Are they entering new markets, new territories or providing new service offerings?

If you don’t see these signals, you may want to start having a conversation with your vendors today. 

 

 

Apax Partners adds Agencyport to its growing property/casualty technology investment portfolio

Apax Partners adds Agencyport to its growing property/casualty technology investment portfolio

Today’s announcement of Apax Partners’ acquisition of Agencyport makes sense. This deal is a further commitment by Apax to the property/casualty software sector—following shortly after Apax’s announcement of its equity investment in the soon to be independent Duck Creek.

Insurers want the internal and external users of their systems to have seamless mobile access to new business and other functionality. Agencyport has developed one of the leading solutions for agents, brokers, and policyholders find information and execute transactions with insurers’ core systems.

As is true for any technology acquisition, the soon to be combined management teams of Agencyport and Duck Creek will need to focus on communicating the benefits of their new relationship to current and prospective customers—sending a “good before, better now” message. Providing “vendor neutral” support to Agencyport customers who do not use Duck Creek solutions and Duck Creek customer who do not use AgencyPort solutions will also be crucial.

A consolidation wave is reshaping the EMEA PAS vendor landscape

A consolidation wave is reshaping the EMEA PAS vendor landscape
At Celent, we have been writing reports profiling policy administration system (PAS) vendors for a long time. In the European, Middle East and African region (EMEA) we have covered up to 50 vendors in some of our bi-annual reports and we know there were approximately twice more active in this region of the world.  The most recent report focused on life PAS in EMEA can be found here. Since our first look at the PAS market in the EMEA region in 2007 we have predicted that its fragmentation and its heterogeneity would lead to a consolidation. It is fair to say that we have been wrong with our prediction or without less humility we can say we have been right but our timing was bad. Indeed, it seems that the consolidation phase we predicted has started to materialize a few year ago but certainly not as early as we thought. In other words we have observed a surge in mergers & acquisitions over the past few years and we think it will still accelerate in the coming months. The most recent acquisition that validates our view is the acquisition of the Danish vendor Edlund by  KMD Group that has been announced this week. Overall we see various kinds of acquisitions:
  • Software integrators-driven acquisitions: large software integrators are trying to diversify their service offering through the acquisition of insurance system IP. The best example of this type of strategic move is for instance the acquisition of Wyde by MphasiS a few years ago.
  • The Private Equity (PE) firms-driven acquisitions: there is a growing interest to invest in the insurance core system space for PE firms. The best examples of this type of acquisitions are the contribution of Riverside in the merger between Charles Taylor and Fadata or Waterland Private Equity investment in Keylane that now combines activities of various PAS vendors including formerly branded LeanApps, Quinity, Mantcore and more recently the German vendor called Geneva-ID.
  • The core system vendor-driven acquisitions: PAS vendors understand they can grow quicker if they merge with a competitor. Sapiens acquisition of FIS Software and IDIT or Prima Solutions acquisition of Albiran a few years ago are good examples.
As already mentioned we expect more M&A to come and we are glad to help our insurance clients to navigate this changing market.  

Why private equity investment in insurance makes sense

Why private equity investment in insurance makes sense
As many of you know, the latest buzzword is FinTech. Considerable money is coming to vendors that are attempting to define the next major technological leap in financial services. This chart, from CB Insights, shows the explosive growth in FinTech investments. It is an exciting time. CB chart What I find interesting is that Private Equity firms are also finding the more traditional insurance market interesting. For example, Moelis Capital made an investment in Insurance Technologies last fall. Insurance Technologies focuses on the front-end of Life insurance, including illustrations and electronic applications. More recently, Moelis Capital announced an investment in FAST Technologies, which focuses on the Life Policy Administration System (PAS) space. Another example is Thoma Bravo, which announced in August that they had purchased iPipeline, another competitor in the front-end space. To me, these investments make sense. They may not be as technologically sexy as something like roboadvisors, but the market is ripe for improvement. The age of the policy administration systems in use is somewhat staggering, with systems that have been in production for decades. On the front-end, the Life insurance market is still surprisingly dependent on a paper application. As someone who has been a part of this space for many years (measurable in decades), it is nice to see that the market finds room to improve.