Is that a computer on your wrist?

Is that a computer on your wrist?
Just a follow-on to Donald Light’s post about the newly annouced iWatch. I’m very curious to see if Apple can again legitimize a new market segment. They didn’t invent the wearable watch, but they have introduced a modestly attractive watch and have a market impact that is impressive. As a part of Celent’s Life and Health team, I see so many uses for the information that could be provided by a solid entrant in the market. I have personally been watching the space for awhile. There are many entrants in the space — Samsung alone has introduced four watches in the last year. I am also a true geek and love new toys. But I don’t own a wearable yet. My fundamental problem is that none of them are really very good watches. They fail every test I have, particularly the size test. I am old school and like watches, but I lean more towards a small, thin Skagen. Even the smallest of wearables, to me, would be like strapping an iPad to your arm and calling it jewelry. We are starting to see some innovation here. The Moto 360 is beautiful, but still huge. Let’s hope Moore’s law kicks into the space soon and we see a sleek, attractive, useful product. Maybe it is the iWatch. We’ll see.

Watch out. Apple with Mayo is heading your way

Watch out. Apple with Mayo is heading your way
Hmmm . . . That combination is pretty tasty in a Waldorf salad, but it’s a bit hard to think of other recipes that do appeal. The Apple Watch is very attractive—one analyst hoped it would be stylish enough to wear to the Oscars. (I’ll let everyone know what I decide to do next year). But from a healthcare and health insurance Internet of Things perspective, questions still remain. Early information is that the Apple Watch’s biomonitoring functions are pretty modest: pulse and movement (and distance?). Did anyone say fitness band? Somehow “killer app” doesn’t sound quite right in this context, but that is the real question in terms of making people with serious medical conditions (or serious medical vulnerabilities) want to buy the Apple Watch. In roughly ascending order of technical and ergonomic challenges—temperature, blood pressure, glucose levels, blood chemistry of all different types, urine analysis, and (why not?) genome-driven personalized medicine—are off in the future, in some cases well beyond the horizon for a wearable (time telling, messaging, location-revealing) device. Meanwhile there is always next year’s Oscars. btw: about the Mayo:  https://www.apple.com/pr/library/2014/06/02Apple-Releases-iOS-8-SDK-With-Over-4-000-New-APIs.html