Striking data point from Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends 2015 report

Striking data point from Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends 2015 report
I spoke this morning with an operations executive at a large insurer which distributes personal lines products through independent agents. He said that they are working feverously to deliver digital service tools to the customer service representatives (CSRs) at agents because they know that the average CSR is now 19 to 26 years old. This insurer is transitioning from a telephony-centered approach to one which includes chat, secure messaging, and intelligent avatars in order to meet CSRs’ expectations about how service should be done. As any insurer distributing through the independent channel knows, the company that keeps the CSRs happy wins! In our innovation research, we repeatedly see the influence of Millennials’ expectations around the consumer experience, but a data point from Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends 2015 report identifies an equal, if not higher, motivator for change from workers. Millennials now represent the largest percentage of the U.S. workforce. Take a close look at Slide 109. It shows that in 2015, for the first time, Millennials make up 35% of U.S. workers. Gen X and Boomers represent 31% each. The data signals a tipping point and it is pretty clear which way this trend is going to continue. Watch as the buzzword “Worker Experience” is added to the already well-worn “Consumer Experience.” For insurers that want to gain an advantage with their own workers, and with their distributors’ CSRs, the field is wide-open. All they need to do is innovate, experiment, put some funds at risk, and transition to digital working. KPCB

Your Natural Best Friend will certainly know that you are sad. But will your customer service chat bot know?

Your Natural Best Friend will certainly know that you are sad.  But will your customer service chat bot know?
AI and machine learning things are moving right along. A few months ago, in a Celent report, I predicted the emergence of a “Natural Best Friend,” a term combining “natural language” and “best friends forever.” However, there is nothing organic about the Natural Best Friend; it is completely a product of technology. The Natural Best Friend will at some point pass the Turing Test (interacting with a person in a way that is indistinguishable from how another person would interact). Natural Best Friends will become sources of not only trusted information and advice, but also of companionship, friendship, and perhaps even some form of wisdom and intimacy. The use of the Natural Best Friend has obvious applications in throughout the entire insurance life cycle: from underwriting to service to claims. Even the possible characteristics of companionship, friendship, wisdom, and intimacy may be of use to insurers. Consider insurers’ brands, built over decades, which stand for trust, reliability, and succor. Once it becomes socially normal to have a personal relationship with the Natural Best Friend, insurers’ (and many other service industries’) sales and service processes will change dramatically. IBM has just announced it is developing customer service software that can interpret the customer’s emotional state by the content and pattern of the customer’s chat messages. Somewhere in the future, the software may be able to analyze a customer’s voice to determine the emotional playing field. Here’s a link to the WSJ story (warning: this might be behind a paywall). The family tree that will produce a baby boom of Natural Best Friends now has a new branch.