Customer journey mapping for a CIO

Customer journey mapping for a CIO

If you’re like most CIOs, your firm has embarked on the latest craze – customer journey mapping.  I’ve blogged about this before.  It’s a terrific exercise – intended to identify how customers engage with your firm through every type of interaction – personal, machine, or paper.  Most are focused on optimizing the interactions between the policyholder and the insurer; some include optimization of the agent experience, and some are starting to look at expanding the experience to look at how to embed the insurance experience in non-insurance aspects of an insureds life.  (See FIGO for a great example).

Some firms have hired third party consultants to help with this exercise; some have even put a new position in place – a Customer Experience Officer – someone who looks across the traditional siloes of underwriting, claims and finance to craft a holistic experience. 

As carriers go through this exercise, demands are being placed on the IT team. Here’s a few ways you may be asked to participate:

  • Data and reporting– Part of understanding the customer journey is tracking it.  Understanding where the biggest interaction points are, and where the biggest pain points are is the first step in improving the experience. You may be asked to install tracking software on the website (if it’s not already there).  Third party data and AI may play into new segmentation schemes as teams are looking at new ways of doing dynamic segmentation (See my report on this topic)  You may be asked to add new reporting or analytics tools as the team looks at using predictive modeling to identify next best action. And you’ll be asked to measure the progress of the new journeys through new reports and new metrics such as a customer friction factor.
  • Workflow and Task Automation – Much of customer journey mapping is figuring out how to operationalize the new journey.  Once the customer experience has been defined, the hard part is to deliver on it.  If you are reliant on people to deliver a consistent experience, you leave yourself open to error.  Your team may need to spend much more time defining business rules and implementing workflows to deliver the experience. If you are one of the insurers that has not yet automated this, you may need to consider adding some additional technology.  (This has actually been one of the major drivers of core system replacement).
  • Customer Communication – Insurers are looking at eliminating the jargon and simplifying the message. This may mean redoing forms or creating new forms.  That’s not a huge deal.  But where we see more effort is finding new ways of communicating with customers.  Text, mobile applications and video are all growing ways of communication.   Here’s a great example of automated video communication to deliver a personal touch with no people involved.  Push communications, text or phone messages letting the claimant know their check has been issued, for example, can reduce calls to the call center while improving customer satisfaction
  • Omni-channel access – Smartphones are on track to bypass desktop computers as the number one way to access websites.   You’ll need to make the website mobile-friendly.  But you also may need to put in a call center – especially for those insurers who are looking at adding a direct or semi-direct channel. 
  • Cool stuff – As insurers start going down this path and get more comfortable being creative, they often look to add more ‘cool stuff’.  Gamification is one of the newer areas – using game techniques to drive engagement and to drive behaviors.  Drones are reducing the need for scheduling inspections.  Video chat for first notice of loss can reduce fraud and improve satisfaction.  There are many tools – and many InsureTech startups playing in this space. One last area that can be kind of cool – the user interface.  If you don’t have formal skills in this area, definitely use an outside consulting firm to help with this. UI design is fairly complex and makes a huge difference in the customer experience.  All of this cool stuff requires integration. One note, while the partners out there likely all have open APIs,  your team may end up spending more time than anticipated making sure your own systems can integrate and send data and service calls back and forth.
  • An agile organization –  As insurers become more skilled at understanding how to tweak and enhance the customer journey, speed becomes even more important.  Creating an innovative, agile organization  is a critical aspect of delivering quickly.  If you haven’t chatted with Mike Fitzgerald on innovation, or Colleen Risk on shifting to an agile development process, now might be the time.

In a highly fragmented industry with excess capital and declining rates, insurers are looking to building a solid customer experience to drive growth and retention.  Journey mapping is one of the tools being used.  Time to step into the fray and get involved. 

The Great AI Wars

The Great AI Wars

Last week saw one of the last big players make their position in machine learning and AI clearer at Apple's WWDC event with the launch of their machine learning options. These days you're not a credible large cloud provider if you don't provide some interesting APIs around machine learning and AI with the likes of Google, IBM, Amazon, Microsoft (Azure), and Alibaba (Aliyun) to name but a few. Apple's discussion focuses on being able to embed these technologies on the device with the Apps rather than perhaps the building of the models and the execution – much less focus on pushing data into the cloud.

The war I speak of in the title however, is not some dystopian future where humanity fights for survival but rather the current war over talent that enables the use of these technologies. Insurers going through digital transformations and looking deeply at their analytics are finding they are competing with ever more unlikely companies for talent including rising InsurTech firms as observed in previous blogs. The good news is that basic machine learning capability and training is increasingly available as the democratisation of machine learning continues apace – in fact if you look at Apple's documentation this discusses the ease downloading and converting models and integrating them to Apps rather than the nuances of various training algorithms.

Machine learning isn't new to insurance with coverage in our predictive analytics reports courtesy of Nicolas Michellod and case studies. It is clear however that these tools and techniques are increasingly being embedded into solutions throughout the insurance eco-system and beyond – and they are raising customer expectations. A discussion on what this means for core systems is given in my recent report here, as well as a discussion on what this means for new front end opportunities with the rise of chat bots in our discussion on conversational systems and a broader discussion on the differences in designing intelligent systems versus programmed ones is discussed in designing the aware machine.

While AI is a battleground for the big players for insurers it is becoming an increasingly accessible source of new approaches and automation – both an opportunity to better serve customers as well as cut costs. The ease with which machine learning and AI can be embedded into simple applications now will only increase adoption and there are small things any insurer can do. Of course if you want to go much deeper, as pointed out in this Harvard Business Review article, if your company isn't good at analytics, it's not ready for AI. I disagree a little with the authors perhaps, we're in a world where anyone can do something – one can just download and convert a model and incorporate it into our systems as pitched by Apple.

For those looking to go further, the good news is there are many vendors that can help, and many partners too of all shapes and sizes. I'm happy to say the InsurTech investments in the industry are only increasing this number and the opportunities for applied AI in insurance. Further, there are many conferences discussing both analytics and the rise of AI – if you're attending or looking for them do get in touch, I or my colleagues would love to discuss.

Reflections from the Digital Insurance Agenda, Amsterdam

Reflections from the Digital Insurance Agenda, Amsterdam

Earlier this month Craig Beattie and I ventured off to Amsterdam to attend the Digital Insurance Agenda (DIA), where we also delivered a keynote. This was the event’s second year and, within just 12 months, it has grown significantly to around 850 people – attracting insurers, innovative technology players (from both the establishment and budding entrepreneurs), and investors from across Europe and beyond. The format is a sprightly mix of keynote presentations, panels, and live demonstrations. And, like last year, it was another great mix of people and ideas, each focused on driving change in customer engagement across the industry through technology.

(Venue: Gashouder at the Westergasfabriek. An impressive venue – with Celent on stage somewhere up there at the front :-))

Key take-aways for me were:

  • Distribution and front-end engagement remains a strong area of focus for innovation. However, unlike recent history where investment has been heavily channelled into mobile or touch-enabled browser experiences, the presence of chat and other app-less modes of interaction were strongly evidenced throughout most of the live demos. This has been a hot trend over the last 12 months, and where Celent has explored both insurer and consumer attitudes towards it (see Celent report: Applying Conversational Commerce to Insurance: Aligning IT to the Machine World). Given the issues that many insurers have had with trying to encourage customers to download their apps and engage with them through them, it’s not hard to see why 'smart chat' is being pursued so aggressively.
     
  • Heavier focus on the use of data for risk profiling and the application of emerging AI techniques (beyond chat use-cases). Personally, I find it incredible just how low the entry barriers have become for experimenting with data and AI. The perfect storm of huge compute power via the cloud, open-source and pay-per-use models for advanced technology enables those with relatively modest means and a great idea to get started. For me, this continues to be one of the most interesting areas in our industry for mining value. It’s also an area that insurers still find a challenge (see Celent report: Tackling the Big Data Challenges in Global Insurance: Differences Across Continents and Use Cases).
     
  • Celent has been tracking the development of innovation partnerships across the industry for a number of years (see Celent report: Insurer-Startup Partnerships: How to Maximize Insurtech Investments). At DIA, it was easy to see this in action. The vast majority of firms presenting were not a direct threat to the industry at large, but instead were exemplars of better ways of doing things through the use of smart technology. It’s not hard to envision that a few of the firms demonstrating at DIA will walk straight into pilots following the event.

The event was closed with a keynote from Scott Walcheck of Trov. Scott shared openly some of the progress that they have been making – which, to me, feels impressive. For example, they now have ~60-70 engineers working on the team and claim to be growing revenue by ~44% month-on-month (albeit from a starting position of zero).

Out of all of the insurtech start-up activity globally, there are just a handful of firms (in my opinion) who have the potential to really shake things up – and Trov is one of these.  They now have the capital, the engineering capacity and the partnerships to do some truly incredible things – if they choose to.

I also found it interesting to hear that they have started to evolve their business model into three focus areas, being: (1) Trov as a direct brand; (2) White-labelled Trov; and (3) Insurance-as-a-service, where they will rent their platform to partners – plus with an aspiration to evolve it into auto, home and other lines.  Given Celent’s focus on technology research across the industry, this last model-type is of keen interest. Trov’s engineering capacity is already a similar size to (and in some cases larger than) many mid-to-small insurance carriers. It is also larger than some of the traditional independent solution technology providers out there. Could they be the next big technology player on the scene in addition to their existing branded business?  Only time will tell, but it is clear they are already demonstrating how insurtech represents a new way of delivering insurance product development.

For more commentary on DIA, see Craig Beattie’s Moments on Twitter.  Also, keep checking the DIA website as they will shortly release some of the videos from the event.

Closing the deal with e-signature

Closing the deal with e-signature

E-signature has become such a part of my life that I am surprised when I am asked to provide a wet signature. I sign for credit card purchases, deliveries and legal documents, even my tax returns (!), using a click or a digital signature pad. But, if I want to change my beneficiary for my life insurance, I have to download a .pdf, sign the document with a pen, and mail it to the insurer. Insurance has been a slow adopter of e-signature. However, as the process of buying life insurance and receiving post-issue service is becoming increasingly more digitized, insurers are working to remove paper from everyday processes.

The adoption of e-applications, web portals, and mobile technology is helping to drive the change, but it is my belief that it is primarily driven by customer expectations set by other industries offering easy-to-use digital processes. Consumers expect companies to be easy to do business with and will choose the company they purchase goods or services from based on the ease of use. E-signatures provide a way to offer a digital experience that is easy to use, fast, and secure.

In our new report, Putting a Lock on Straight Through Processing, my colleague Karen Monks and I profile 11 providers of e-signature technology for insurance. This is the final report in a series that began last year.  During the year, we looked extensively at new business acquisition and the technologies that power it. We wrote reports on solution providers for illustrations, e-application, and new business and underwriting in addition to e-signature. Along with the vendor reports, the series included two benchmarking reports and a report in which insurers compared their level of automation to Celent's automation capability matrix to determine if they are minimally, moderately, or highly automated.  

With the increased emphasis on cycle time and cost, e-signature is being increasingly being adopted as a way to check the box on making processes fast, flexible, and efficient. E-signature software frequently integrates with other solutions to support new business acquisition as well as post-sale service.

The ability to collect an electronic signature for a new application at the time of sale providing the legal authorization to obtain underwriting requirements and evidence from third party providers has enabled straight-through processing and the ability to provide a decision to the applicant within minutes, instead of weeks.

Common e-signature use cases for life insurance:

  • New policy application
  • Disclosure delivery
  • Agent licensing and appointment
  • E-delivery of policies
  • Beneficiary change and other policy servicing
  • Premium payments

Life insurers that investigate e-signatures will be pleasantly surprised by how quickly and relatively inexpensively e-signature can be implemented as well as how easily and securely a paper signature process can be automated. I am a big fan, as I’m sure you are, of less paper and more automation!

 

A cautionary tale of legacy technology or how to avoid a major meltdown in your organization

A cautionary tale of legacy technology or how to avoid a major meltdown in your organization

Were any of you flying Delta from April 5 to April 9?  If so, this story will be no surprise to you.  For the rest of you, you may remember it was spring break and terrible weather pounded Atlanta. The severe weather caused a five–day meltdown across Delta’s flight network and over 4,000 flights were cancelled. During those five days, Delta struggled mightily with two basic functions of its business – flying airplanes and accommodating passengers. The weather is, of course, out of Delta’s control, but the response and the ensuing chaos was amplified by something insurers understand all too well — the lack of modern technology. 

According to a Wall Street Journal article, the root of the problem was a telephone busy signal. An internal investigation found the biggest problem was that Delta’s 13,000 pilots and 20,000 flight attendants calling in for a new assignment couldn’t get through to the people in Atlanta who were rebuilding the airline schedule. Computers told gate agents rescheduled crews would be there, but the flights would end up canceled for lack of a crew member who was lost in Delta’s communication fiasco and unaware of the assignment.

I have to confess, my first thought when I read this article was to wonder how on earth a major company like Delta can be so lacking in modern technology. My next thought was wow, this is true for the insurance industry as well. While life insurance companies don’t have the challenges of rescheduling thousands of flights, a negative change in the stock market can create thousands of customer calls. And when a major catastrophe occurs, property casualty insurers can also be inundated by phone calls.

Delta’s response was to double the size of the crew-tracking team, dramatically increase the number of phone lines by June; and hope to have a system which will be able to send crews information about their trips electronically by August.

Rather than relying on hope, following are suggestions for insurers so that they can avoid the type of meltdown experienced by Delta:

  • Self-service portals or apps where customers can check their balances, make changes to their policies, and communicate with their insurer.
  • Chatbots that can provide answers to questions without human interaction.
  • Text messages to keep insureds informed.
  • Webchat to allow communication via the website.
  • Omni-channel support to allow seamless switching between devices.

We can’t control the weather or the stock market.  Unexpected events will happen.  But, how an insurer responds to them can have a significant impact on the customer experience and the customer long term relationship with the insurer.  In a hyper-competitive market, customer experience is a key differentiator.

If you are interested in building a better customer experience, here is a report you may find interesting, Standing Out in a Bland World: Global Life Insurance Customer Service Strategies.

The Death of Processes and the Birth of High Frequency Underwriting

The Death of Processes and the Birth of High Frequency Underwriting

Let’s consider a car insurance market where all new contracts go through online aggregators. Let’s assume all the car’s information (vehicle brand, type, category, plate number, etc.) and potential insured data (driver’s name, age, address, historical claims, etc.) is standardized, packaged to include all relevant information needed by an insurer to price a motor insurance risk, and instantaneously electronically transferred to an aggregator as soon as the car is purchased (payment triggers the packaged data transfer, quoting, binding, and contract sealing). With today’s technology and connectivity, this quote and bind process can be done in less than a second.

In insurance, a process is a series of tasks to turn raw data into valuable information to make a business decision. In other words, a process requires time between its inception and its end and almost always human intervention. Indeed, today’s quote and bind process captures relevant data about a car and a driver through a questionnaire. Then insurers need to evaluate the risk involved and price it before a quote is given and potentially accepted by the driver. Even though many digital interfaces can be offered to perform the whole process, the potential customer still has to respond to a set of questions and click on a button to accept a proposal. In our extreme digital example, all the tasks are reduced to a minimum of time and fully automated; the driver doesn’t even have to fill in a questionnaire since all relevant data is packaged, transmitted, analysed, and sealed into a new car insurance contract in less than a second as soon as the car purchase is triggered. Can we still call it a process when there is an instantaneous business decision (underwriting and pricing) made and an outcome (contract sealed) produced, and this without human intervention? Well, I think with extreme digital, processes as we know and define them today are dead.

The next question is: How can insurers differentiate in a world where customer engagement is nonexistent? One might think that it would be price. Actually, it is speed. Indeed, I think that the ability to match a specific demand faster than competitors will allow an insurer to win the deal. To do so, they’ll need to support what I call high frequency underwriting in order to have their quote matched with the demand side within milliseconds (faster than competitors’ quotes). Indeed, for the same price, the fastest proposition will win the deal.

Now, let’s get back to my initial assumption: all new contracts go through online aggregators. Let’s consider an aggregator owned by an insurance player. If this insurer can get time advantage versus other insurers feeding its aggregator, it will be able to adapt its quote to optimize its margin using competitors’ information and leverage the speed advantage, even though it is about milliseconds.

This scenario is not unrealistic, because high-frequency trading is about milliseconds. So, who knows, maybe one day we will see insurers not thinking much about processes, but focusing more on speed.

The new customer experience – or how so many carriers are getting journey mapping wrong

The new customer experience – or how so many carriers are getting journey mapping wrong

Journey mapping, the process of defining the customer experience, is an activity that has been gaining in popularity over the last two years.  Carriers are using this technique to document the existing customer experience in order to identify areas to improve.  The underlying assumption is that a superior customer experience will drive retention and perhaps improve new business.  Which makes sense.  After all, it’s pretty evident that customers are demanding a different relationship model from their insurers.  They are looking for more transparency and simplicity. They are increasingly self-directed and financially literate.  And they are demanding increasing participation. 

Their expectations are increasingly driven by experience in non-insurance categories.   I can see where my uber car is real-time – why can’t I tell if my claim check has been issued.   I can custom assemble a new pc online with instant knowledge of all the options available and the price associated with them – why can’t I tell what additional insurance options are available and what they cost.   I can get recommendations from Amazon on what I might like and what others like me are purchasing – why can’t I get  good recommendation from a carrier to help me compile the best package of coverages, terms and conditions to suit my profile. 

While efforts have been made to drive effectiveness for insurance processes from an internal perspective, there are still many areas where improvements are possible from a customer perspective. So carriers are working to define an extraordinary experience for customers. They’re defining personas, mapping the new business acquisition process, the billing process, claims, complaint handling, customer inquiries, and all the major processes that occur when customers interact with carriers. 

But that’s the problem. Carriers are focusing on optimizing all those places where the customer and the carrier interact.  Now don’t get me wrong. There is nothing wrong with this.  Carriers should make sure that interactions are optimized.  Focusing on automating decisions, automating correspondence, and using workflow to assure tasks are completed in a timely manner can have a dramatic effect on delivering a consistently good experience.  Omni channel, real time, digitization – all those trendy words – are very relevant here. But it’s not enough.

If you really want to build loyalty, think about the customer experience when they aren’t interacting with you. Let me give you an example. 

Allstate has a target market of motorcycle riders, and has a mobile app for them called GoodRide.  The app is available for both Allstate customers and non Allstate customers.  It helps riders keep track of all repairs and maintenance.  They can plan a ride –  checking weather, locate gas, and even find others to ride with as it is integrated to social media. They can track their ride by adding notes, adding photos and tracking miles ridden. There’s even a gamification element that awards badges.   And by the way, they can report a claim, check proof of insurance and pay their bill.  So this application really looks at what motorcycle riders are looking to do outside of the insurance interaction and embeds the insurance interactions within the full context of the customer’s life and where insurance itself plays a role rather than simply looking at the interactions discreetly.

In the commercial lines world, a similar application could be industry based and provide tailored risk management materials, an “Ask an Expert” corner where customers can check in with risk management consultants,   create a Facebook-like collaboration mechanism for customers to talk to each other,  arrange discounts on products relevant to the industry.  and of course, access their policy online, pay a bill, pull a loss run or handle other interactions. 

Expanding the customer experience beyond the pure insurance interactions makes a carrier more relevant to a customer by engaging in their everyday lives and looking for ways of adding value within context.  And it creates a way to have an ongoing conversation with a customer – building personal loyalty. 

So – is customer journey mapping a good idea?  Of course.  Are carriers thinking big enough? That is a different question.

What I will say, is exactly what I told a carrier earlier today –  The secret to organic growth?  Deliver a customer experience that your competitors can’t match. 

The Best Advice is Personal

The Best Advice is Personal

Much discussion has happened in the industry portending the inevitable elimination of the insurance agent as consumers move to purchasing insurance direct and online. Disruption of the agency model seems to be a foregone conclusion judging by the amount of recent investment in InsureTech startups focused on transforming the distribution model. The increase in insurers offering commercial insurance direct may be seen as an inflection point not just in terms of commercial lines sold direct, but in terms of a shift in momentum from the agent to technology, across lines of business. It’s not surprising that both insurers and consumers are interested in a shift in channels. It promises to be less expensive for an insurer to go direct, and consumers are clearly showing a shift in preferences for accessing coverage

However, consumers use agents for very good reasons. Prior to direct purchase on the internet, consumers needed agents to access different markets. There was no mechanism for a consumer to purchase directly from an insurer. With the advent of digital agents, aggregators, and direct-to-consumer insurance insurers, this reason is less important than it used to be. However, replacing an agent isn’t as simple as simply automating access to markets.

One of the primary points of value provided by an agent is personalized advice. Although access to markets is more readily available, consumers still need advice and guidance. Insurance is a complicated product. Understanding which coverages they should purchase, what limits and deductibles are appropriate, and whether additional terms or endorsements are relevant is one of the key points of value that an agent offers.

Consumers are more financially literate than ever before given all the information available on the internet, yet still want transparency in the choices available, and value guidance and advice as to what options are appropriate and why they are appropriate. 58% of consumers surveyed say that when choosing a financial services provider, they are looking for a personalized offer, tailored to the individual firm or person.

Until an insurer can accurately and appropriately provide advice it is unlikely we’ll see a wholesale shift of the channel. Some insurers focus on giving consumers choices by providing price comparisons with other insurers. Others have tried to provide choice by labeling side by side choices with titles such as “less coverage”, “standard coverage”, and “more coverage”. But these choices don't usually have any relationship to the actual risk profile of the prospect and don’t offer any suggestion as to why one option is better than another. Consequently, consumers aren’t confident enough to make a decision.

Want to know how to improve online conversion? Provide actual advice to a prospect with an explanation as to why a particular limit, deductible or coverage is relevant. Anecdotal conversations with companies who have implemented a feature like this indicate potential conversion improvements of 20-30% or more.

Automated advice comes in a variety of permutations that vary depending on how much automation is utilized and how much personalization is provided. Insurers can assess their capabilities and determine how to proceed down the path. Even small amounts of advice seem to have an impact on conversion.

Automated advice can range from very simple parameter driven advice, to incredibly sophisticated advice-for-one backed up with sophisticated analytics. It can be delivered via simple online suggestions, or through a guided journey using a chat bot. Each successive generation of advice engine seems to bring increasing benefits when it comes to conversion.

Yet automated advice also carries potentially significant risks. The customer is relying on the technology – including the assumptions and methodologies that underlie it. For example – did the system ask the right questions; did the prospect understand the questions adequately to answer accurately; did the algorithms act as intended, were the underlying business rules appropriate?

Using third party data can mitigate some of these risks, but raises other issues including the accuracy of that data. On the one hand, consumers are more financially literate, are looking for more transparency and control, and expect insurers to utilize technology in an online environment. However, insurers also have to be careful not to be creepy when using third party data.

Insurers can overcome creepiness by not overreaching, and by clearly communicating how they arrived at their conclusions. In this transparent world, the path to the recommendation becomes nearly as important as the outcome.

Interested in learning more about automated advice engines? Check out my newest report “The Best Advice is Personal: Robo-Advisors v. Agents”.  

When plumbers sell insurance

When plumbers sell insurance

Digital and digitization in insurance are terms that have been increasingly used in the insurance industry over the past decade and not only by insurers but also by consultants, IT vendors and research firms. I have already provided my high level definition of digital and digitization in this blog.

While attending RGI's Next event, where an innovation for the connected home was presented, I reflected on the visibility of the relationship between the insurer and the end-consumer. Many innovation and digital gurus claim that with digitization insurance will become invisible. At the first sight, it sounds like an interesting idea and of course it would be logical to believe that if there is less or no human intervention then it would be difficult for a consumer to get a physical representation of an insurance product and the company behind it. However, I don’t like the idea of insurers becoming invisible. Insurance is a difficult product to understand for average consumers because it is not something they can touch and feel. In addition, risk is a concept that is highly conceptual especially for young people. Many consumers, who buy insurance for the first time, do so because it is compulsory and in general they don’t try to analyse the details of the product, which is nothing more than a list of benefits, terms and conditions that are painful to read and difficult to understand. I think digitization represents a great opportunity insurers have to seize to better productize insurance products. Making insurance invisible does not properly address the consumers’ needs and expectations I think. In our open world where information is so easily accessible and transferrable and where transparency is important, insurers need to make insurance more palpable and digitization is a great opportunity to democratize the knowledge of insurance and risk among the public. Let’s take the example of home insurance. What if home insurance is sold on top of a box (an Apple TV style one) that controls various sensors that monitor home parameters including thermostats, smoke detector, video surveillance and water usage? The insured would be able to regularly check these sensors via a smartphone app and be informed quickly about abnormal events. With this box, the insurer would add home insurance at a preferred price (maybe included with the box warranty). The connected home model is an interesting example demonstrating that digital transformation can contribute to making insurance products more palpable and risk easier to understand and to monitor from a customer point of view. So when will we see plumbers and electricians sell home insurance!