Voice recognition access means one less password

Voice recognition access means one less password
If you are like me, you have at least 15 passwords or PINs that you must remember. Passwords are a necessary evil of the digital world. I have a user ID and password for everything from accessing my child’s homework assignment to checking my bank balance. Most annoyingly, the passwords never have the same expiry date so they are never synchronized. I, like many others, ironically keep my passwords in an app that requires a password.   One financial services company, Manulife Financial, has come to the rescue by providing the ability to access your accounts by using only your voice. I say ‘hallelujah’!   Celent is often asked by insurers about voice recognition IVR and will now be able to point to a working model. Nuance Communications is providing the voice recognition technology. The software stores the customer’s unique voice patterns and characteristics. When accessing the account through the call center, the caller repeats a passphrase and access is granted when the voice is matched to their stored ‘voiceprint.” This is an optional service, but I am sure everyone will want to take advantage of having one less password to remember.   Insurers continue to look for ways to increase customer loyalty, improve the overall customer experience and reduce call center costs. With the introduction of the voice recognition IVR, Manulife has addressed all three salient points. New uses for biometrics will continue to lead the insurance world into the future one innovation at a time.

The Promise of End User System Maintenance

The Promise of End User System Maintenance

One of the benefits of investing in modern, configurable software that is often sought is the ability to move creation and maintenance of systems to the business areas. The premise is that transferring these functions to users will increase quality and reduce costs. In Celent’s discussions with insurers and observations, this is often a goal which is more aspiration than realization.

Our research has begun to quantify the extent to which functions are transferring within various solutions. For example, the graph below details the responses from U.S. insurers using a stand alone rating engine when asked what percentage of work is being performed in their business areas:

Surprisingly, create/change workflow rules are performed more often than change rates. This reflects the expansion of stand alone raters beyond simple arithmetic calculators that was reviewed in the Celent report Future-Proof: Considerations in Choosing Rating Solution Platforms. Not surprisingly, deployment to production is often held in the IT area. For more details, reference the report: US Property/Casualty Rating Systems: ABCD Vendor View, 2009)

We are continuing to collect such data across different software platforms in order to quantify the “promise” of end user maintenance.