Would you spot the warning signs of a failing project?

Would you spot the warning signs of a failing project?

Every large project I have been involved with began with enthusiasm and high hopes. The go decision concludes a sizable project of its own — creating and receiving approval for the business case. The initiative begins in a celebratory fashion. The project sponsors are overrun with volunteers for the project. There are numerous kick-off meetings with a festive tone. Communication about the project occurs often promoting the merits of the project. It is sunshine and roses ahead!

Flash forward, the project communication may have slowed down to a trickle. The project team members have lost their enthusiasm, and the project has become mundane. Many times there have been as many failures as successes. It is not unusual to lose a key sponsor. At times, it may become necessary to revise the goals of the project, or, in the direst situations, abandon the future phases.

I am sure that readers are thinking, “This will not happen to my project.” I certainly hope that is true! But, if your project is on a downhill slide, there are steps that can be taken to get back on course. An important first step is a project health check.

A project health check is designed to provide an independent and impartial evaluation of a program or project. The health check evaluates the overall health or risk profile, assesses stakeholder satisfaction, and provides practical recommendations that the team can use for reducing risk and in extreme situations, for project audit, recovery, or rescue. The health check covers all levels of the project from the business executives and sponsors to the technical team members to provide a comprehensive view. It focuses on:

• Business objectives, scope, and requirements assessment.
• Contracting and financials.
• All processes, deliverables, and communications quality.
• Exception management that includes issues, changes, and risks.
• Project data and plan assessment.
• People assessment.
• Best practices effectiveness.
• Evaluation of the technology and its feasibility and compatibility with the current and/or planned environment.

Very often, those closest to a project are the ones that have difficulty in seeing the progress. Health checks are best undertaken by third party assessors, who can provide an unbiased and balanced view and opinion.

My new report,  Staying on Track when the Transformation Road Changes, has more information on project health checks as well as the do’s and don’ts of running a successful project. I hope all of your projects are success ones!