Voice recognition access means one less password

Voice recognition access means one less password
If you are like me, you have at least 15 passwords or PINs that you must remember. Passwords are a necessary evil of the digital world. I have a user ID and password for everything from accessing my child’s homework assignment to checking my bank balance. Most annoyingly, the passwords never have the same expiry date so they are never synchronized. I, like many others, ironically keep my passwords in an app that requires a password.   One financial services company, Manulife Financial, has come to the rescue by providing the ability to access your accounts by using only your voice. I say ‘hallelujah’!   Celent is often asked by insurers about voice recognition IVR and will now be able to point to a working model. Nuance Communications is providing the voice recognition technology. The software stores the customer’s unique voice patterns and characteristics. When accessing the account through the call center, the caller repeats a passphrase and access is granted when the voice is matched to their stored ‘voiceprint.” This is an optional service, but I am sure everyone will want to take advantage of having one less password to remember.   Insurers continue to look for ways to increase customer loyalty, improve the overall customer experience and reduce call center costs. With the introduction of the voice recognition IVR, Manulife has addressed all three salient points. New uses for biometrics will continue to lead the insurance world into the future one innovation at a time.

The security breach of the month/week/day – and why you should consider the Cloud

The security breach of the month/week/day – and why you should consider the Cloud
I don’t want to pick on one particular company, but the breach at Anthem hits pretty close to home — our industry is under attack. Should this surprise you? Absolutely not. What is particularly concerning is that these are companies that are spending enormous sums of money to stop these intrusions.   And are still getting hacked. JPMorgan Chase, Home Depot, Target, Michaels. I list these, not just as a reminder, but because I personally was affected by all four breaches. I’m on my third credit card in just over a year because every breach forces a new one. The JPMorgan Chase and the Anthem breaches are different and more onerous. In the Target breach, and others like it, credit cards were compromised. You can close a credit card account. In the recently disclosed Anthem breach — everything was lost. Name, Address, Social Security number, employer, net worth.   In other words, everything to steal your identity. I can’t close my life and open a new one. Is there a purpose to this rant? There is.   First, the technology exists — and is reasonably affordable — to encrypt this data. Is it a big project? Of course. Do you still want me to be your customer? How is it that in 2015 critical data about me is sitting in a data center and not encrypted?   Second, one of the biggest arguments against using applications in the Cloud is that having data in your own data center is more secure. Really? Seems not. I was recently discussing running a Life insurance system in the cloud with the CIO of a larger insurer. They put forth the ‘safer in my shop argument’, so I asked them a simple question: Is your budget for security larger than Google, Amazon or Microsoft (three of the largest Cloud vendors)?   After much thought, he replied that it was not, and our discussion changed paths. So maybe it is time to rethink the importance of your own data center. Beyond just security, is it your core competency to run a data center? Does it bring new revenue into your company to run a data center? Is it cheaper to run your own data center?   I believe the answer to all three is a resounding No. So when you are out looking for new applications and technology, I suggest it may be time, or beyond time, to think differently. Oh, and start asking your personal bank, credit union, insurance company, etc.: is my data encrypted?

Risk, reward and cyber-scurity

Risk, reward and cyber-scurity
For most people the amount of time, skill and effort required to get access to our family photos far outweighs the possible value someone would find there in. Thus, security measures based on making it really quite difficult to get to the data while at the same time not too hard to use have become increasingly popular. I would file username and password security in here. Occasionally, the digital assets on the other side are valuable to the right group. Banks use 2 factor authentication and a variety of non-digital schemes to ensure security. Even World of Warcraft where rare digital swords and armour carry their own value offer broader measures of security to protect accounts. The recent leak of a number of celebrities private photos shows that there are other assets worth the time and effort required to break this level of security. The risk associated with the data insurers hold has to date been quite minimal. There are health, specialty lines and large commercial lines where this isn’t the case, but for most people the data held by insurers and available through portals is largely innocuous and available through other means. As insurers start to tap into wider data sources and the Internet of Things it is imperative that the industry considers how it protects it’s customers. A simple example from products available today: some insurers likely hold the real-time location of the car driven by celebrities and millionaires children, thanks to the increasing popularity of telematics based car insurance. This brings with it increased security, the opportunity to recover the car if stolen and the opportunity to bring much needed assistance swiftly if the car and driver suffer an  accident. In the wrong hands this data is sadly highly valuable and thus worth the time, effort and risk to assault and try to recover. Whilst the details around the leak are still emerging it is clear that it is incumbent on the providers of these services to offer sufficient security in the first place and to educate it’s users on appropriate use. To insurers looking at cloud and portals, I say consider the edge cases – the celebrities using your security for instance, those for whom there are organised groups who would be rewarded for getting the data. Take into account the type of data available through various security schemes and portals, some information is naturally less sensitive. No one will read a story about a film star’s driving score and premium due next month, but where they drove and when – well maybe that’s a headline you don’t want your name associated with.

BlackBerry Security vs Apple's Appstore – Will the PlayBook vs iPad split IT and Business?

BlackBerry Security vs Apple's Appstore – Will the PlayBook vs iPad split IT and Business?
There is no question that mobility and highly mobile devices will play a key role in insurance, both for customers but also as a means for conducting business. Apple have created a great deal of press with their iPhone and iPad products and are now making headway into insurance companies. Indeed in the last two weeks in the UK it was announced that Lloyds of London are now trialling iPads to enable electronic processes in a previously heavily paper based environment. Also in conversations with CIOs in the UK, the iPad and iPhone is proving popular with senior executives. Surely then BlackBerry have arrived too late with their not yet released PlayBook? Actually, BlackBerry may have arrived just in time as far as security specialists in insurers are concerned. Most people aren’t aware that the key reason BlackBerry is so popular with large corporates is the management and security features built into the platform. We’ve all read about the incidents where laptops have been left on trains and even read about organisations fined many millions of pounds through data loss events. Apple are investing in this area but are currently far behind BlackBerry in security features. Google’s Android platform is even further behind. It may well be that internal security teams are banking on PlayBook’s success as a way of delivering something iPad like to an organisation but retaining the necessary controls and measures to avoid significant embarrassment to the organisation. So the race is on. Will Apple secure their first mover advantage and build in enough enterprise level requirements to their platform in time or will BlackBerry’s strong history in enterprise solutions allow them to recapture lost market share?